The Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union (FFAW-Unifor) represents approximately 15,000 working women and men throughout Newfoundland and Labrador, most of whom are employed in the fishing industry. We also have members working in the hotel, hospitality, brewing, metal fabrication and oil industries.

Latest News

6/19/2019

Historic Victory for Fish Harvesters as Owner-Operator Policy Becomes Law

6/18/2019
Offers have been submitted to the Standing Fish Price Setting Panel, with the FFAW Negotiating Committee submitting a final offer of $0.35/lb and ASP offering $0.30/lb.
6/18/2019
“We were pleased with the arbitrator’s decision to put a stop to the preferential treatment of a select few that was not afforded to the entire crew. We are all equally important to the operation of this vessel. A better solution would have been to offer everyone the same package,” says Graham Davis, who has been a crew member on the Ocean Breaker for 9 years.
6/18/2019
“At the height of the seismic season, our Union is working around the clock to avoid gear entanglements with seismic vessels and mitigate any direct impacts on fisheries,” says FFAW-Unifor President Keith Sullivan. “Unfortunately, it often feels like a one-way street, with fish harvesters making all the sacrifices while oil and gas companies have free reign of the ocean.”
6/13/2019

Applications for the Post-Season Snow Craby Survey were mailed earlier this week.

6/13/2019
For years, our organization has been calling on the federal government to step up and implement a real ecosystem management approach, including addressing excessive predation. Many species of groundfish will be unable to adequately recover without proper management of the grey seal population. The government has prioritized an overabundant seal population over the protection of rebounding fish stocks,” says Sullivan.
6/13/2019
While a 15 per cent increase is certainly beneficial to harvesters, industry stakeholders are confident that a higher TAC is warranted for a stock that has experienced such unprecedented growth.

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